Great Leaders And Managers Solve Issues

Leaders And Managers Solve Issues

After a full and productive Annual Season with my clients, I’m always left reflecting on some common themes.

This year, what resonated most was the relationship between members of a leadership team and a company’s Issues List. That reflection led me to a question every leader should ask:

“What verb describes how I most frequently impact our company’s Issues List?”

The only great answer to that question is “Solve.”

Put simply, great leaders and managers solve issues. They’re comfortable raising their hands and admitting they have an issue. They’re good at IDS™ing it – identifying its root cause, discussing it briefly, and then solving it by agreeing on a plan of attack that will make the issue go away for the long-term, greater good of the organization.

Sub-par leaders seem to be good at everything but that. They hide issues – concealing mistakes and weaknesses from their teammates. They create issues by not hitting their Scorecard numbers, not completing their Rocks, and not doing their jobs consistently well. They ignore issues – even when they’ve been on the Issues List for several quarters and should be solved by the person who sits in their seat.

Frankly, it’s maddening to watch – and I only spend one or two days per quarter with a client. I can only imagine how it feels for the other members of the leadership team or the people who report to such a leader. They watch this behavior week in and week out in Level 10 Meetings™. The Issues List grows, the frustrations mount, and the team or the company never breaks through the ceiling.

If that sounds familiar, please ask this question of yourself and your teammates (out loud) at your next Level 10 Meeting. Commit to being a person who most frequently solves issues. And, if you want to achieve your company’s vision, make sure you’re surrounded by others able to do the same.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published as “What Relationship Do You Have With Your Issues List?” on April 26, 2018

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